Antiques News & Fairs Previews
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News & Fairs Previews

Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

At the Sign of the Dial: Rare English Clocks by Great Makers
Selling Exhibition continues until Christmas at 123 Kensington Church Street, London W8

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks' recent exhibition 'At the Sign of the Dial: Rare English Clocks by Great Makers' is to be extended through the Christmas period by popular demand following very successful sales to both new and existing clients of this very popular member of the antiques trade.

Howard told ANF: "We haven't finished yet. There is considerable ongoing interest in a number of pieces, so it has been decided to extend the exhibition until Christmas."

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

SOLD - Miniature burr walnut longcase clock by Christopher Gould, c.1710, in the region of £100,000


Highlights were the sales of four longcase clocks including two by Thomas Tompion, England’s greatest clockmaker. The Tompion clocks were each sold priced in the region of £230,000. There were a number of good sales of 17th and 18th century English table clocks. An incredibly rare and beautiful miniature burr walnut longcase clock by Christopher Gould, made for the Italian market circa 1710, sold for in the region of £100,000. It strikes the hours and repeats the quarters on six bells and has suona / non suona in Italian engraved on the dial for strike/ silent.

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

George II period cream lacquer longcase clock with three train brass dial quarter chiming movement and moonphase by Isaac Nickals, c. 1750

Howard Walwyn has built a reputation over 30 years as an expert dealer in the finest English clocks and barometers, dating from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The exhibition celebrated his 25th year of retailing in Kensington Church Street in London, six of which have been at his current premises, Number 123. The street is famed for its variety of specialist antiques dealers.

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

William III period floral marquetry and walnut 8-day longcase clock by John Ebsworth, c.1695-1700

Recently been elected to the Council of the British Antique Dealers Association (BADA). He is also a member of The Association of Art & Antiques Dealers (LAPADA) and CINOA the European dealers’ association, and is a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers. In 2012, he advised on the purchase of 25 clocks for Dumfries House Trust, Scotland (Patron, HRH The Prince of Wales), and has sold clocks to museums around the world.

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

Queen Anne period longcase clock decorated with exceptionally fine lacquer work on a faux tortoiseshell ground, with an 8-day movement by Francis Gregg, c.1711-1714


At the Sign of the Dial – the exhibition was named for the dial symbol that typically indicated the premises of a clockmaker in the days before many people could read. Symbols and pictures were the easiest means of showing what trades or businesses were located at a building, possibly more for the benefit of servants fetching and carrying for their masters. Thomas Mudge (1715-1794), whose clock is on show, advertised himself at the Dial and One Crown, opposite the Bolt & Tun, Fleet Street; similarly Stephen Rayner, who became a Brother in the Clockmakers’ Company in 1691, had a workshop at Ye Dial, Bishopsgate Within; and Francis Gregg moved his premises from Covent Garden to the Dial in James Street over against the Palace Gates’ in St. James’s, no doubt to benefit from the proximity of the Court. Thomas Tompion could be found off Fleet Street at the Dial and Three Crowns, although prior to 1690 the building was known simply as The Three Crowns. His sub-tenant was Jasper Braem, a Dutch cabinet and clock case maker, who supplied Tompion with marquetry cases, in addition to inlaying the Duchess of York’s bed “done with several coloured woods in resemblance of flowers, leaves etc …” at Windsor Castle – so the Three Crowns symbol may refer to tradesmen in the property who were supplying members of the Royal family.




News & Fairs Previews

Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

At the Sign of the Dial: Rare English Clocks by Great Makers
Selling Exhibition continues until Christmas at 123 Kensington Church Street, London W8

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks' recent exhibition 'At the Sign of the Dial: Rare English Clocks by Great Makers' is to be extended through the Christmas period by popular demand following very successful sales to both new and existing clients of this very popular member of the antiques trade.

Howard told ANF: "We haven't finished yet. There is considerable ongoing interest in a number of pieces, so it has been decided to extend the exhibition until Christmas."

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

SOLD - Miniature burr walnut longcase clock by Christopher Gould, c.1710, in the region of £100,000


Highlights were the sales of four longcase clocks including two by Thomas Tompion, England’s greatest clockmaker. The Tompion clocks were each sold priced in the region of £230,000. There were a number of good sales of 17th and 18th century English table clocks. An incredibly rare and beautiful miniature burr walnut longcase clock by Christopher Gould, made for the Italian market circa 1710, sold for in the region of £100,000. It strikes the hours and repeats the quarters on six bells and has suona / non suona in Italian engraved on the dial for strike/ silent.

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

George II period cream lacquer longcase clock with three train brass dial quarter chiming movement and moonphase by Isaac Nickals, c. 1750

Howard Walwyn has built a reputation over 30 years as an expert dealer in the finest English clocks and barometers, dating from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The exhibition celebrated his 25th year of retailing in Kensington Church Street in London, six of which have been at his current premises, Number 123. The street is famed for its variety of specialist antiques dealers.

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

William III period floral marquetry and walnut 8-day longcase clock by John Ebsworth, c.1695-1700

Recently been elected to the Council of the British Antique Dealers Association (BADA). He is also a member of The Association of Art & Antiques Dealers (LAPADA) and CINOA the European dealers’ association, and is a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers. In 2012, he advised on the purchase of 25 clocks for Dumfries House Trust, Scotland (Patron, HRH The Prince of Wales), and has sold clocks to museums around the world.

Antiques News & Fairs - Howard Walwyn Fine Antique Clocks extends successful exhibition

Queen Anne period longcase clock decorated with exceptionally fine lacquer work on a faux tortoiseshell ground, with an 8-day movement by Francis Gregg, c.1711-1714


At the Sign of the Dial – the exhibition was named for the dial symbol that typically indicated the premises of a clockmaker in the days before many people could read. Symbols and pictures were the easiest means of showing what trades or businesses were located at a building, possibly more for the benefit of servants fetching and carrying for their masters. Thomas Mudge (1715-1794), whose clock is on show, advertised himself at the Dial and One Crown, opposite the Bolt & Tun, Fleet Street; similarly Stephen Rayner, who became a Brother in the Clockmakers’ Company in 1691, had a workshop at Ye Dial, Bishopsgate Within; and Francis Gregg moved his premises from Covent Garden to the Dial in James Street over against the Palace Gates’ in St. James’s, no doubt to benefit from the proximity of the Court. Thomas Tompion could be found off Fleet Street at the Dial and Three Crowns, although prior to 1690 the building was known simply as The Three Crowns. His sub-tenant was Jasper Braem, a Dutch cabinet and clock case maker, who supplied Tompion with marquetry cases, in addition to inlaying the Duchess of York’s bed “done with several coloured woods in resemblance of flowers, leaves etc …” at Windsor Castle – so the Three Crowns symbol may refer to tradesmen in the property who were supplying members of the Royal family.